About the blog:
The multifarious issues of classism and living in poverty in one little blog from a poor person who like vast majority of fellow low-income people IS NOT LAZY.

About me:
I refuse to lie down and tolerate classism in silence. I will not keep quiet. I will call out classism and any other form of -isms I discern. I tolerate no oppression, including and ESPECIALLY legally sanctioned discrimination. .
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
cartoonpolitics:

"Debt is a trap, especially student debt, which is enormous, far larger than credit card debt. It’s a trap for the rest of your life because the laws are designed so that you can’t get out of it. If a business, say, gets in too much debt, it can declare bankruptcy but individuals can almost never be relieved of student debt through bankruptcy." .. (Noam Chomsky)

cartoonpolitics:

"Debt is a trap, especially student debt, which is enormous, far larger than credit card debt. It’s a trap for the rest of your life because the laws are designed so that you can’t get out of it. If a business, say, gets in too much debt, it can declare bankruptcy but individuals can almost never be relieved of student debt through bankruptcy." .. (Noam Chomsky)

Why I Love My Sport

Money (mostly) doesn’t matter. It doesn’t matter what you were born. Contrary to the rest of the world where luck (what you were born, family members’ connections, where you live, whether you can afford a car or were born into a family too poor for a car just to name a few luck-based things) plays a huge role, sports are based almost entirely off hard work. Natural talent does play a small role, and athletes whose families have money can do clinics and camps athletes like me cannot, but practice is by far and by large what matters most.

Needless to say, I often wish that I were a man and that my sport was football or baseball. I’d never have to worry about money again. I’d be set for life and able to help others too.

“Equal rights for all, special privileges for none” ~ Thomas Jefferson By

This is a quote I saw in my feed on my athletic Twitter. (I have several- one on being asexual (my sexual orientation), one about my real-life doings (mostly being an athlete working two jobs and trying to balance national championships with survival) and @voicefrompoor.

Yes, I know Jefferson owned slaves so to him these were just words. However, words that to me ring very true to something I believe in

It was once said that the moral
test of government is how that
government treats those who are in
the dawn of life, the children; those
who are in the twilight of life, the
elderly; and those who are in the
shadows of life, the sick, the needy
and the handicapped. By Hubert Humphrey

neurosciencestuff:

Missing sleep may hurt your memory
Lack of sleep, already considered a public health epidemic, can also lead to errors in memory, finds a new study by researchers at Michigan State University and the University of California, Irvine.
The study, published online in the journal Psychological Science, found participants deprived of a night’s sleep were more likely to flub the details of a simulated burglary they were shown in a series of images.
Distorted memory can have serious consequences in areas such as criminal justice, where eyewitness misidentifications are thought to be the leading cause of wrongful convictions in the United States.
“We found memory distortion is greater after sleep deprivation,” said Kimberly Fenn, MSU associate professor of psychology and co-investigator on the study. “And people are getting less sleep each night than they ever have.”
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calls insufficient sleep an epidemic and said it’s linked to vehicle crashes, industrial disasters and chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes.
The researchers conducted experiments at MSU and UC-Irvine to gauge the effect of insufficient sleep on memory. The results: Participants who were kept awake for 24 hours – and even those who got five or fewer hours of sleep – were more likely to mix up event details than participants who were well rested.
“People who repeatedly get low amounts of sleep every night could be more prone in the long run to develop these forms of memory distortion,” Fenn said. “It’s not just a full night of sleep deprivation that puts them at risk.”


Someone needs to explain this to Teach for America, a program in which I was a corps member for  a year, whose  training program, summer institute, often called “boot camp” or “initiation” by new “CMs”, is structured in a way that ensures corps members almost never even get five hours of sleep, let alone a full night. Yet they’re supposed to learn about how to effectively understand, let alone teach, kids living in poverty? It’s  not fair to either the CMs who are suffering sleep-deprivation’s effects or the kids who NEED their teachers in top form

I did and still take exception to the brutally regimented Teach for America Summer Institute on both an intellectual and moral level. People should also be informed that if you voice your concerns with the scientific backing, they respond in a very vitriolic way. They don’t take kindly to dissent, Teach for America 

(Sleep deprivation is also a tactic frequently used in “enhanced interrogation”

neurosciencestuff:

Missing sleep may hurt your memory

Lack of sleep, already considered a public health epidemic, can also lead to errors in memory, finds a new study by researchers at Michigan State University and the University of California, Irvine.

The study, published online in the journal Psychological Science, found participants deprived of a night’s sleep were more likely to flub the details of a simulated burglary they were shown in a series of images.

Distorted memory can have serious consequences in areas such as criminal justice, where eyewitness misidentifications are thought to be the leading cause of wrongful convictions in the United States.

“We found memory distortion is greater after sleep deprivation,” said Kimberly Fenn, MSU associate professor of psychology and co-investigator on the study. “And people are getting less sleep each night than they ever have.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calls insufficient sleep an epidemic and said it’s linked to vehicle crashes, industrial disasters and chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes.

The researchers conducted experiments at MSU and UC-Irvine to gauge the effect of insufficient sleep on memory. The results: Participants who were kept awake for 24 hours – and even those who got five or fewer hours of sleep – were more likely to mix up event details than participants who were well rested.

“People who repeatedly get low amounts of sleep every night could be more prone in the long run to develop these forms of memory distortion,” Fenn said. “It’s not just a full night of sleep deprivation that puts them at risk.”

Someone needs to explain this to Teach for America, a program in which I was a corps member for a year, whose training program, summer institute, often called “boot camp” or “initiation” by new “CMs”, is structured in a way that ensures corps members almost never even get five hours of sleep, let alone a full night. Yet they’re supposed to learn about how to effectively understand, let alone teach, kids living in poverty? It’s not fair to either the CMs who are suffering sleep-deprivation’s effects or the kids who NEED their teachers in top form

I did and still take exception to the brutally regimented Teach for America Summer Institute on both an intellectual and moral level. People should also be informed that if you voice your concerns with the scientific backing, they respond in a very vitriolic way. They don’t take kindly to dissent, Teach for America

(Sleep deprivation is also a tactic frequently used in “enhanced interrogation”